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"Ghetto" Kent College School Production

 

February 2017

Kent College Pembury’s 2017 production was another masterpiece in the school’s long history of outstanding performing arts.  This year saw a radical departure from previous productions at Kent College with the theatre space transformed into an abandoned warehouse and the audience fully immersed in the action of the play, moving around the space with the actors.

 "Ghetto”, by Joshua Sobol is set in the Jewish ghetto of Vilna, Lithuania in 1942, and based on diaries written during the darkest days of the holocaust, tells of the unlikely flourishing of a theatre at the very time the Nazis began their policy of mass extermination. First seen in Israel in 1984 and premiered in Britain in David Lan's version in 1989 at the National Theatre, Ghetto won the Evening Standard Award for Best Play. It has since been seen in Berlin, Vienna, Cologne, Toronto, Oslo, Paris, Chicago, Washington, Los Angeles and New York before students at the independent day and boarding school in Pembury produced their own stunning version.

Headmistress Julie Lodrick commented:

I was touched and moved beyond words after seeing one of the five performances of Joshua Sobol's play, 'Ghetto', this year's annual drama production at Kent College.  The audience was unable to speak at the end and we all filed out in quiet contemplation; something I have never experienced at a school production. 

 

'Ghetto' requires a talented and versatile cast of actors, singers, dancers and musicians and it is testament to the willingness of the girls and staff to take on such a challenging and emotionally demanding piece of theatre.  All the seating in the theatre was removed and the space was turned into  a large warehouse setting enabling the production to become a piece of immersive theatre, which served to make the performance even more powerful.  The cast had been to hear the experiences of a holocaust survivor earlier in the term, it was a privilege to see the young performers capture and deliver their roles with a maturity and understanding beyond their years.  

 


Posted: 20/01/2017 at 10:10
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